Involved Fathers

I was quite interested in seeing the benefits that come to children with involved fathers.  I learned that infants as young as three months know the difference between their mother and father.  Involved fathers seem to lead their children to score higher on cognitive tests and also can increase their chances of graduating from high school than those fathers that are not as involved.  Children with involved fathers are also less violent and generally have more success in their future career than children without involved fathers.  Most importantly, children raised by involved fathers are more likely to take on a positive role with their future families.

I was also curious to see the role of fathers with their children in families that are separated.  These children tend to get higher grades and have better social skills than those without involved fathers.  They seem to have more friends and can deal with social situations better.  In addition, they seem to have fewer behavioral problems and are less likely to have mental problems as adults.  This is especially true for daughters.  As seen above, regardless of the marital situation between parents, involved fathers make a drastic difference in the lives of their children.

Source: http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Hidden_Benefits/

Ryan Van Wagenen

Author Bio:
I am Ryan Van Wagenen.  I am originally from Pasadena, California and I am here at the University of Utah pursuing a degree in Economics with a minor in Psychology.

I interned this past summer in Investment Banking at Citigroup in New York and I am planning on going back there to work full time upon graduation in May 2010.

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~ by Ryan Van Wagenen on December 4, 2009.

11 Responses to “Involved Fathers”

  1. Great post! As a hopeful future father I love to see the importance my job will play in my children’s lives. I believe that parents are equal in terms of influence, as an involved mother plays just as big a part in a child’s life as the father. I don’t know where I would be without my father, but I know I wouldn’t as well off without him. Thanks for the good info.

    Mike Angerbauer

  2. For sure! I was curious to see specific benefits that come from having an involved father. Thanks for the comment!

    Ryan Van Wagenen

  3. It’s true – you really can’t over estimate the importance of an involved father. And the earlier the better. Most men want to be inolved with their babies and kids – they just need to know what to do, and that their contribution is valued.

  4. Very true. There should be a pamphlet that is given to fathers while their wives are in labor giving some of the positive statistics on being an involved father. Thanks for the comment!

    Ryan Van Wagenen

  5. I greatly enjoyed your post. You brought up some great points on how involved fathering can benefit those children. I extremely liked your point about three month olds being able to identify their mothers and fathers. I found that most interesting. Good job on your post!

    Ashley Crawford

  6. I don’t see how not having an involved father in your child’s life could be negative. We as a whole have lost sight of that and I think it’s time that Fathers step up and we make sure that we have good fathers for our children. Great post!

    – Becky Knoblauch Smart

  7. You really hit this on the head. When I was younger my dad wasn’t really around a whole lot because of work. Above you said that at a young age children can distinguish their father from their mother. Interesting enough, when I was little I used to call my father “Uncle” Jim because I thought that he was one of my mom’s brother’s and this really frightened my parents. I grew out of it of course but I’ll never forget it.

  8. You really hit this on the head. When I was younger my dad wasn’t really around a whole lot because of work. Above you said that at a young age children can distinguish their father from their mother. Interesting enough, when I was little I used to call my father “Uncle” Jim because I thought that he was one of my mom’s brother’s and this really frightened my parents. I grew out of it of course but I’ll never forget it.

    -james frost

  9. I think fathers and fathers-to-be should keep in mind that it is the QUALITY of time – not the quanityt – spent with their kids is what really counts. My dad has lived in Seattle throughout my whole life and has always kept in touch with me on a daily basis whether it was through calling, texting, or MSN messaging. He still continues to do this. On top of that, we both make an effort to see each other at least once every 4-5 months. It’s been tough getting my driver’s license, graduating from college, and taking my first drink without him physically present. However, I have learned that these moments do not necessarily matter. What matters are the moments I DO spend with him. My dad has always been and always will be an involved father.

    Marissa Hayes

  10. I agree with you Marissa, quality of time is everything! I think as long as the child gets attention and feels love from their father, many of the benefits listed above in the post will occur for the child. Every situation is different and there are many ways a father can be involved in the lives of their children. Thanks for the comment!

    Ryan Van Wagenen

  11. This is looking more like a string of facebook wall comments, haha. But you guys do seem to have good points, yay for good points!

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