Mommy vs. Daddy

Perhaps a few of us have been wondering about the role of the mother and father in enabeling secure attachments in their children. I think that maybe we got the idea that mothers do more in the child development than the father.
On page 435 in our Child Development book it states, “Fathers’ sustained affectionate involvement predicted later cognitive, emotional, and social competence as strongly as did the mothers’ warmth – and occasionally more stronger.”
I came across a Youtube video that explains a little further the role of the father in a child’s development.

“In general, the ways in which mothers and fathers establish relationships with, and influence their children’s development is quite similar. While much has been made of research showing that mothers and fathers have distinctive styles of interactions with their infants, these differences are actually quite small, and do not appear to be formatively significant. The benefits of remaining contact with both parents succeed any special need for relationships with male or female parents. The impericle literature shows that infants and toddlers need regular interaction with both of their partents to foster and maintain their attachments.” (video)
Later you will learn that infants form attachments with their parents at roughly the same time, even if many fathers in our culture spend less time with their infant children. This shows that time spent interacting is not the only factor in the development of attachments.
With this said, we should understand that interactions with infants from both partents is equally important for the child’s development of healthy attachments.


Here is the link.

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~ by Jeffery Scott on October 16, 2009.

One Response to “Mommy vs. Daddy”

  1. How would being raised in a single parent home influence the development of a child then? If both the parents do practically the same thing for the child than will just extra time spent with the child do the same thing as spending time with both parents?
    Emily Blackburn

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